Equine Assisted Therapy & Wellbeing

 

 

Equine Assisted Therapy (EFP) uses equine-facilitated activities to explore the way a client sees and relates to themselves and others, their patterns of behaviour and survival as well as their gifts and strengths, and may include the exploration of past experiences and traumas. Equine Assisted Therapy is a form of psychotherapy and relies upon the therapeutic knowledge and experience gained through a mental health qualification.

Equine Assisted Wellbeing (EFL) uses equine-facilitated activities as a tool for self development and education, with a focus on the present moment. Skills developed include non-verbal communication, assertiveness, creative thinking, problem-solving, leadership, teamwork, relationship skills, confidence and resilience.

Horses and humans are connected in deep and profound ways. History shows us a long and multi-faceted story of horses and humans working and living side-by-side. More recently, neuroscience has shown us remarkable similarities between the limbic (emotional) brain of horses and humans, which make it possible for horses to serve as both our mirrors and our teachers in terms of understanding ourselves, our emotional life, and the way we relate to ourselves and those around us. And then there is that inexplicable feeling of being around a horse; as Churchill once said, ‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man‘, (and of course a woman, and a child).

Equine Assisted Therapy and Wellbeing gives us opportunities to interact and form relationships with horses, and to learn from these experiences in a way that involves us physically, emotionally and mentally. Lessons learnt in this holistic way can be more easily absorbed and remembered, resulting in lasting and positive changes that can be transferred to the world of human-human relating.

And these intelligent, sensitive creatures are also our friends; they live entirely in the present, offering us patience, forgiveness, and another chance when we get it wrong. Do we always know how we are feeling? Are we always aware of how we are behaving or affecting others? Horses are radars for incongruence, and will reward us when we behave in a way that is in keeping with who we really are and what we truly feel.

(www.leapequine.com)

Claire Ryall

MBACP (Accred) Counselling & Psychotherapy

Certified LEAP facilitator in Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy

 

 

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